Archive for the ‘iPhone’ Category

Will 3G iPhone Battery Life Be Any Better?

iPhone 2G Battery Life Disappoints – Will 3G Be Any Better?

Will the iPhone 3G Battery Life By Any Better?

Over the past month or so, I’ve noticed a steady decline in the performance and life of my iPhone battery. A little disappointing to say the least. It seems I can’t go any more than 2 days without charging my iPhone up again… where as when I first picked up the unit, I could go 4, 5, maybe even a week without charging depending on how heavily it was used.

This got me to thinking… What are the specs on the new iPhone 3G battery anyway? I certainly hope it packs in a much improved battery… I’m getting a little tired of charging this darn thing!

So lets take a look at the new iPhone 3G battery specs:

iPhone 3G Battery Specs:

Talk time: Up to 5 hours on 3G / Up to 10 hours on 2G
Standby time:
Up to 300 hours
Internet use:
Up to 5 hours on 3G / Up to 6 hours on Wi-Fi
Video playback: Up to 7 hours
Audio playback:
Up to 24 hours

Compare those numbers above to the original 2G battery life estimates of 5 hours of talktime on 2G, and 16 hours of audio playback, you can see that the battery issue has been addressed. With the 3G you’ll get double the talk time (if you’re still on 2G) and an 8 hour increase in audio playback time. We can only assume and extrapolate that all other factors have increased to a similar degree as well.

Of course, I would expect the usual slowdown in performance and life of the battery. I guarantee that when you pick up you iPhone 3G in July (or win one) that in a years time you have a pretty good shot at griping about the drop in battery performance… Lets hope for the opposite though

(Via Mactropolis.com)

The iClooly 3G iPhone Stand

iPhone Accessories – The iClooly 3G iPhone Stand

The 3G iPhone isn’t even out yet (due July 11th) and the manufacturers are starting to get their accessories for it out.

iClooly 3G iPhone Stand

You may remeber the iClooly iPod Touch stand we featured previously, well the have a new version out for the 3G iPhone.

The iClooly 3G iPhone stand features a 90 degree pivot joint so you can watch your iPhone in either portrait or landscape, it also features ports, so you can use your dock connector and headphones.

The iClooly 3G iPhone stand is available to buy online for $68.50 from GeekStuff4U.

(Via Geeky-Gadgets)

Mercedez Loves the iPhone…who doesn’t?

Mercedez Loves the iPhone

Mercedez Loves the iPhone

The iPhone has definitely injected new life into the world of consumer electronics since it was launched, and this ripple is even felt in the automotive industry with Mercedez unveiling a new cradle just for the iPhone in the following models – the Mercedes-Benz C-, E-, CLK-, CLS-, S-, CL-, SL-, M- and R-Class (all those in addition to the upcoming GLK-Class). You do need to specify Optional convenience telephony (Order Code 386) first, where the cradle will then hook up with the iPhone through the optional Media Interface or the retrofittable iPod Interface Kit. When installed, the iPhone’s functions are controlled through the multi-function steering wheel controls. Pricing for the Apple iPod cradle is set at €249 after taxes. On a note of conscience – should you be purchasing a gas guzzler like a Benz in today’s world?

(Via Ubergizmo)

iPhone Clone Battle from Gizmodo!

iPhone Clone Battlemodo: Which One Is the iPhoniest?

Okay, so the iPhone 3G is going to be the second coming of Jesus in pocketable form, but maybe you’re a rebel and don’t wanna look exactly like the estimated 27 million other tools expected to be running around with an iPhone by 2009. You wanna be different. (Or maybe you can’t seem to break out of that damn Sprint contract.) Still, you do want a touchscreen, 3G data, a music player and all that jazz. Is there an iPhone clone worth buying from your carrier? Relax, we’ve done the work for you and broken down the top three nationwide carriers’ best iPhone wannabes into a single chart.
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To sum that up, the Instinct is easily the best, most feature rich iPhone clone on the block, and at $129, is a steal for Sprint customers. My major problem with it is the touchscreen itself—I think the Vu’s touchscreen is way more responsive. (Wilson likes it just fine, favoring it over Verizon’s cloneys.) The Vu has everything superficial down right—the touchscreen, keyboard (best of the bunch) and phone body—but is really lacking in the feature department, and therefore not really worth the new $199 price, which hinges entirely on its Mobile TV function. If you married the Vu’s body and touchscreen to the Instinct’s features and price, you’d have a champion here, and a serious iPhone challenger. Too bad LG and Sammy hate each other.

The Voyager isn’t considered an iPhone clone anymore, not in the strictest sense, though most of its problems stem from Verizon software rather than the hardware. As Wilson said in his review last fall, it’s ambitious but flawed—and the flaws are mostly on Verizon. I’m really hoping Verizon lets the Dare just breathe, because the Vu proves LG is best left to its own devices. The Glyde is just a truly terrible phone. Most clay bricks are more responsive than its touchscreen, especially around the edges, and the crappy, sluggish Verizon software doesn’t help. And its keyboard ain’t much better.

One thing they all have in common is a shi**y browser. There isn’t a mobile browser that touches mobile Safari yet. Even when they could render HTML correctly, moving and zooming around the page (especially ones that aren’t mobile optimized) is an exercise in self-control—how long can you take it before stabbing your eyes out. Opera mini does load on the Vu, and it’s better than the included browser, but it worked kinda wonikly at times. For me, that’s a critical flaw in all of these phones.

Best to worst: Instinct, Vu, Voyager, and Glyde.

(Via Gizmodo)

Why Apple iPhone wannabes don’t cut it (it’s the software, stupid)

MacDailyNews
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Apple’s influence on high-tech markets has long exceeded the company’s relatively small market share, and nowhere is that more obvious than in the wireless phone market. Barely a year after it introduced the original iPhone, Apple (AAPL) has redefined the wireless handset,” Stephen H. Wildstrom reports for BusinessWeek.

“And with the impending shipment of a new version that should put the iPhone in the mainstream of consumer and business markets worldwide, Apple is extending its sway over much larger players such as Nokia and Samsung,” Wildstrom reports.

“The most immediate impact of the iPhone has been on hardware design, encouraging a rash of imitators with big touchscreens,” Wildstrom reports. “That includes the new Samsung Instinct, which Sprint Nextel has been billing as an iPhone killer.

(Via macdailynews )

iPhone Apps

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Wondering what’s coming when the AppStore launches in early July? So are we, and here’s what’s been announced in the past few days:

  • Webstate is building iSharephone. It’s Sharepoint on your iPhone. It will connect your phone to Microsoft Sharepoint portal servers.
  • Want to create music on your iPhone? Intua is developing it’s BeatMaker product, which will let you beatbox, loop and sequence your way to musical joy.
  • Ambrosia SW has announced Mobile Mahjong for iPhone. It’s built around Core Animation and promises a “Cover Flow interface for level selection.”
  • EasyTask Manager is a simple task manager that’s getting ported to the iPhone. Here are a couple of early product screen shots.
  • Rusty Red Wagon is porting Solitaire to the iPhone, with three variations: Klondike, Freecell and Spider.
  • Synthesis is working on a SyncML data sync product. For now, it’s planned as a free contacts-only version but they’re hoping to expand it to provide calendar support, which their developers say is not currently available in the SDK.

    (Via (TUAW))

iPhone Flash in early development

MacNN | Adobe: iPhone Flash in early development
49E34ECA-932F-4F3C-834E-42575D92639E.jpgAn iPhone version of Adobe’s ubiquitous Flash plug-in is still early into development, the company has admitted. In an earnings call for Adobe’s second financial quarter, CEO Shantanu Narayen has responded to questions on if and when Flash will be ready for the iPhone 3G, which itself is only expected to ship on July 11th.

Apple has long blocked the normal desktop version of Flash from the iPhone, insisting that it consumes too much battery power.
“With respect to the iPhone, we are working on it,” says Narayen. “We have a version that’s working on the [SDK] emulation. This is still on the computer and you know, we have to continue to move it from a test environment onto the device and continue to make it work. So we are pleased with the internal progress that we’ve made to date.”

Apple has meanwhile begun parallel development with SproutCore, a JavaScript framework that my provide functionality similar to Flash. The latter standard is still likely to be needed however, as it is used on many popular media-heavy websites.

(Via macnn)

AT&T (not) limiting iPhone 3G speeds? huh…

MacNN | AT&T (not) limiting iPhone 3G speeds to 1.4Mbps
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Readers of AT&T’s Apple iPhone 3G website, have this weekend been left confounded by information that iPhone 3G data download speeds will apparently be limited to 1.4Mbps, while other devices tout much faster speeds. With the figure also echoed in the official AT&T press release, speculation is that the 1.4Mbps limit is not a website error.

With the latest HSDPA cards now offering speeds up to 7.2Mbps, and even iPhone 3G rivals such as Motorola’s Moto Q listed capable of 3.6Mbps speeds, it would seem that the iPhone 3G, despite being significantly faster than the first iPhone model, may not, at first glance, live up to its early “3G” promise; it is unclear why the yet-to-be-released device would be slower than “3G” device counterparts from other companies.

With clarification expected from AT&T in the next few days, this download speed ‘mystery’ can only serve to confuse potential buyers in an already crowded and complex 3G market, while 3G device rivals are offering faster download speeds.”

(Get the WHOLE story Here!!)

iPhone’s Impact on it’s Rivals

The iPhone’s Impact on Rivals
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It didn’t take Apple (AAPL) long to make its mark on the mobile-phone industry. In the first year after the introduction of the iPhone, Apple grabbed handset share from rivals including Research In Motion (RIMM), while AT&T (T), the only authorized U.S. provider of iPhone service, used the device to lure customers from Alltel and T-Mobile USA. Imagine the ripple effect of a cheaper, faster, more feature-packed version of the iPhone.

Not only has Apple whacked as much as $200 from the iPhone price and made it capable of working on a faster wireless network, but the company is also adding a wide range of software features that may make it more appealing to consumers and business users alike. The new iPhone is due in July.

To cope, wireless service providers are likely to increase their own mobile handset subsidies, boost marketing budgets, and reduce prices on some services, analysts and industry insiders say—all likely to mean slimmer margins. Rivalry from Apple adds to the pressure on an industry already grappling with increased government regulation and competition from new players, including Google (GOOG), that threaten to loosen service providers’ control of the market.

In the past year, U.S. wireless carriers had scaled back on the subsidies that resulted in lower handset prices in exchange for long-term wireless service contracts. But now that AT&T is boosting its subsidy of the iPhone, chances are other operators will follow suit—especially on iPhone copycats. “Most people want the iPhone, just as they want the iPod and not some other MP3 player,” says Gloria Barczak, professor of marketing at Northeastern University. “People want the real thing.” Consumers will need an incentive to settle for something other than the iPhone, she says. The new iPhone 3G will sell for $199 to $299 with a two-year contract from AT&T.

Read Full Article HERE.

(Via BusinessWeek.)

The iPhone 3G…everything you need to know!

The iPhone 3G FAQ [IPhone Faq]

Gizmodo provides all your answers!!

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Steve Jobs may have launched the iPhone 3G on Monday, and we may have gotten a hands on with it already, but in typical Apple fashion, there’s still a lot of stuff left unsaid. How does activation work? How will first-gen iPhone users bring an iPhone 3G onto their plan? Does the GPS work for driving? How much will games cost on the App Store? We’ve got answers. Lots of them.

The Phone

How much will an iPhone 3G cost? $199 for the 8GB version, which comes only in black, and $299 for the 16GB version which comes in black and white.

What’s changed between the first generation and the iPhone 3G? Honestly? Not all that much. The iPhone 3G has all the features of the first one, plus faster 3G data downloads, GPS, and a better battery life. Externally, the phone’s casing is slightly changed, with a thinner edge and thicker middle, but a flush headphone jack and solid-colored back make up the only other major differences visually. Everything else from the screen to the number of buttons and switches on the outside are the same.

How much will it really cost me over 2 years?. That depends on how many minutes you use and how many text messages you want to sign up for, but at AT&T’s lowest plan price of $39 a month for 450 minutes, plus a mandatory $30 data charge and $5 for 200 text messages, you’re looking at $1975 over the course of two years. Before tax and other fees. Here’s how it stacks up against the old iPhone and against other 3G smartphones on Verizon and Sprint.

When can I buy it? If you’re in one of the first countries to get the phone, which includes the US, Canada, the UK, Spain, Japan and Mexico, it’s July 11. Otherwise, it’s still unknown. Come July 11, there’s going to be a gigantic line of people wanting that phone. You’ll have to wait not only for people in front of you to buy a phone, but activate it too—which is now mandatory and takes about 10-15 minutes. If you can wait, we’d recommend going after July 11.

Where can I buy it? In either an Apple store or an AT&T store. There won’t be any online orders for this one.

How fast is the 3G over 2G (EDGE)? During the WWDC keynote, Steve Jobs showed a demo that compared the iPhone 3G vs. the old iPhone when downloading a large web page with lots of images. Apple’s site lists the result of that matchup as 20 seconds vs. 48 seconds, which is 2.4x faster. We’ve got a explainer about the details of 3G as well, if you’re interested.

How does the GPS work? We’ve got a great tutorial on how the iPhone’s GPS works. Long story short, it’s A-GPS, or assisted GPS, which means most of the time it uses the cell towers and Wi-Fi to help triangulate (but doesn’t necessarily need help). If you’re looking to use the iPhone 3G as a GPS in your car for navigation, there’s a catch. There’s a restriction in the SDK that prohibits developers from using the phone for “real time route guidance”. You can still use Google Maps to help guide you if you’re lost, but it’s not as smooth a system as a real GPS. TomTom may have an iPhone 3G guidance suite already in the works, despite the SDk restrictions.

Will the added 3G and GPS hurt my battery life? Apple’s improved the battery life compared to the old version, which ups the talk time on 2G (same as the first iPhone) from 8 hours to 10 hours. On 3G, you get half that. So yes, your battery life will be significantly degraded when you’re using 3G instead of 2G. Apple still hasn’t provided numbers on how much GPS use will degrade your talk time.

What about that rumor that the iPhone 3G has a front camera? Yeah, not so much. Apple didn’t say anything about that during their keynote, and there’s been no evidence of it yet. There’s a weird anomaly on the demo iPhone that Apple’s Phil Schiller was using on stage during the event, but it’s probably just a weird fingerprint.

What comes inside the iPhone 3G box? Not a whole lot. There’s no dock, but there is a smaller charger that’s great for children.

Does the iPhone 3G finally have MMS/picture messaging? Unfortunately not. Not officially, anyway. There are third-party apps already available that give your iPhone a sort of MMS functionality, but it’s not great.

Can I tether the iPhone 3G to my laptop to get on-the-go internet? Not out of the box, no. The old iPhone was able to be hacked into doing this, but EDGE speeds meant that people only really used it in emergencies. With 3G, it’ll be much more useful. We’ll keep an eye on this one.

How durable is it compared to the first-gen? Our hands-on will tell you more about that, but from what we heard, the new backing is a lot more fingerprint-smudgy than the first.

(Read Full Article—> Gizmodo.)

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